License for TECH CORPORATION’s Fine-Bubble Generation Technology on Sale in U.S., China, Southeast Asia, Elsewhere since Feb. 1, 2021

HIROSHIMA, Japan, Feb. 4, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — TECH CORPORATION Co., Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as 'TECH CORPORATION'), a developer and manufacturer of environmental and hygiene-related equipment based in Hiroshima, Japan, announced on February 4 that on February 1, 2021, it had placed on sale the right to license international patents for the company's proprietary fine-bubble generation technology for homemade equipment. Bubbles smaller than 100 micrometers which float in water are fine bubbles. Fine bubbles have a cleaning effect and are effective in preserving freshness, promoting plant growth, sterilization and penetration.  They are expected to be used in different areas, such as conservation of the environment, agriculture, fisheries, food processing, medical care, and beauty. TECH CORPORATION has patents for the technology to generate 'ultra-fine bubbles' of less than 1 micrometer in Japan and overseas. In addition, the company holds a "fine-bubble electrolyzed water" generation patent that is expected to have sterilizing and cleaning effects.  TECH CORPORATION will sell its patent licenses to domestic and overseas companies wanting to use this technology to make products and develop applications. Source: www.prnewswire.com  

CHINA VS USA: CHINA WILL WIN THE RACE OF INTERNET OF THINGS

As per the global market research company International Data Corporation (IDC), China will outperform the UnitedStates in 2024 in the China vs. USA race to become the world's largest Internet of Things (IoT) market. At the cusp of another technological revolution, the current fact remains. A few new technologies such as 5 G, Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, robotics, 3D printing, autonomous systems, cloud computing, and blockchain are driving the revolution, all driven by data.   It's interesting that, under the influence of Trump, the US went the other direction to China. In August, Trump signed a $716 billion defence strategy bill as well as tightening legislation to curb Chinese participation in US innovation.  China's investment in management platforms is vital to its ability to oversee and provide infrastructure on a global scale. The Industrial IoT (IIoT) is the location where the money is at the end of the day.  The Americas rules the world in IoT ventures covering: Connected Industries (45 percent), Connected Building (53 percent), Connected Vehicle (54 percent), Smart Energy (42 percent), Connected Health (55 percent), Smart SupplyChain (49 percent), and Smart Retail Chain (49 percent), as per a January 2018 IoT Analytics study (53 percent ).   According to the report's numbers, China's IoT spending is expected to hit around US$300 billion by  2024, with the compound annual growth rate staying at 13 percent over the next five years.   Xinhua news organisation outlined that, among the 20 companies covered in the IDC research, government, manufacturing, and consumer IoT spending will account for more than half of the total market spending by 2024.  The country saw disturbances in the IoT sector due to COVID-19 and reduced IoT spending  across all businesses in mid-2020, according to Jonathan Leung, a senior market analyst with IDC China.  As China continues its journey to recovery, we expect the sector to skip back in the coming years as companies are begging to take on the fundamental role of IoT in preventing and managing epidemics, as well as their ability to alleviate market disruptions.  The size of China's Belt and Road Initiative and the potential ROI in terms of economic returns and democratic influence are far more difficult to put a figure on, regardless of the prevalent share of worldwide IoT ventures that the Americas admire. This is why China's spending assessments have gone from $1 trillion to $8 trillion for the project, with One Belt, One Path extending from its 2013 underlying commitment to a cross-continental road and a maritime road to integrate space travel (space tourism and transport, etc.), the travel industry, the internet, and some more.  This is why IIoT is an especially clear indication of the potential for China to politically, financially and technologically strengthen its span across the globe. What's more, in reality, as we begin in 2021, economics, diplomacy, and technology in this new race between powers are by no means different.  China wants a little bit of the digital pie, not just IIoT opportunities. The worldwide digital economy is expected to cross US$23 trillion in size by 2025 and Huawei is the biggest player in taking advantage of this opportunity fromChina's point of view. Source: www.analyticsinsight.net

Nokia plans to launch Android Go phone in China where stock Google apps do not work

Nokia 9.3 Pure View will not be turning up in the immediate future. Although that is sad, in the low- and mid-end  price ranges, HMD Global is moving ahead with other devices. The company has announced that on December 15 in China, it will launch a new Nokia system that runs on Android Go software. This is shocking because, due to censorship, stock Android apps do not work in China. Like other mobile brands, HMD Global sells custom skinned Nokia phones in China. Nokia has posted a new teaser on Weibo that reveals the new device's December 15 launch date. The teaser also reveals that Android Go a trimmed down version of Android appropriate for phones with 2GB or less RAM, will come with this unit. Google also provides updated versions of its applications, such as, among others, YouTube Go, Google Go, Gmail Go, Maps Go. And because of internet limitations, any of these apps won't operate in China. On Pixel phones, Android Go is as pure as the vanilla Android, which means it requires the services of Google to function properly. There is nothing HMD Global has saidabout how this would be feasible, but it may have a way to eventually bring Android Go to China. Since no one has ever attempted to make a custom version of the app for Android Go, we never knew if there would be one. If HMD Global manages to do that it will build a flood of low range smartphones for other manufacturers in China. But little is clear on how Google will work with apps built for Android Go.   In India, HMD Global offers Nokia 3.1 Plus and Nokia C3 as their cheapest smartphones. These two smartphones are based on software for Android 10, with the skin of HMD Global on top. None of China's Nokia smartphones come with Google software, which is why HMD Global uses alternatives to pre-load its phones for each app group.  The Nokia Android Go smartphone will cost CNY 1,000, which translates to roughly Rs 11,300, according to a study by Seekdevice. However the phone's translated pricing places it in the budget category. In India, the smartphone entry level segment is between Rs 5,000 and Rs 7,000. But in the Chinese market, maybe HMD Global is trying out something new. Nothing is revealed by the teaser on Weibo. On the TENAA certification website, a Nokia computer with model number TA-1335, with a weight of 122 grammes and dimensions of 81x44,5x22 mm, was found. Since this will be an Android Go unit, along with 64 GB of storage, it will have 2 GB of RAM, according to the listing. A notched monitor, an octa core processor, one camera on the rear, one on the front and a 2500mAh battery under the hood could be included in other specifications.  According to the filing, support for up to 4G networks will only be available on Nokia devices. If this is the same system is not verified, but we will know shortly.Source: indiatoday.in